What’s next

January 19, 2009

Neo4J as a Grails backend

Filed under: Grails,Java — stigl @ 3:07 pm
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This post is a reply to @EmilEifrem‘s twition.

Neo4J could be a nice extension as a Grails’ persistence backend, similar to a DB, space or LDAP. The problem today is that GORM is tightly coupled to Hibernate. Looks like @GraemeRocher is in the works of extracting Hibernate as a plugin, from which one can use other persitence plugins. Absolutely looking forward to that. (Graeme, please document what defines the folders which contain domain classes, controllers and views, so they can be changed!).

@Nawroth recommended using Neo4J through a JCR layer, though theres no implementation for Grails or Neo4J. The motivation for this is to be able to use the nice features such as MyPersonNode.find(), trinity.save() … Recommend watching this clip 4 intro to Grails.

What can be done today is just using the Neo4J jar in Grails as it is. But the magic of  GORM that makes Grails so different, compared to regular Java won’t exist…

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December 27, 2008

Teaching the internet generation to code

Filed under: Uncategorized — stigl @ 4:06 pm
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My 12 year old nephew is a heavy user of Vista, abuser of MSN, scoundrel on teh internetzor, and is fair on english. I will not discuss how much further I was at that stage, but I believe that the creation of nifty GUI OS’ and xtrem good looking games has minimized the incentive of writing code to do stuff. So how do we teach coding to the internetzor generation and make it interesting for those with a short attention span? (more…)

December 6, 2008

Groovy does Neo4J thanks to Maven Simplicity

Filed under: Groovy,Java — stigl @ 11:54 pm
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Guillaume Laforge, Groovy Project Manager, kicked off a debate on the Neo4J mailing list with his post Groovy and Neo4J. He stated some examples of how Neo4J could be more Groovy. However, since most Neo4J developers aren’t familiar with Groovy, the topic wasen’t tested out further.

Therefore, with of my L337 skillz in Groovy, Neo4J and Maven, I saw it my destiny to create a simple Neo4J test in a Groovy environment to validate Guillaume’s propositions. Along the way, I had to add some GMaven magic, embedded Neo4J, Mercurial version control and Maven Archetype for distribution. No wonder why I didn’t get this out the door yesterday! 😉
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November 30, 2008

On demand development IDE plugin as a resource to the source code

Filed under: Uncategorized — stigl @ 10:41 pm
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A cumbersome task which everyone who wants to join a software development project, opensourcy or enterpricy, is setting up the development appropriately. This is becoming more apparent due to the new programming and scripting languages and frameworks like Rails which pop up every now and then. We are getting somewhere (Maven 2)when it comes to making sure the source code compiles and runs out of the box. But the development environments still need to be downloaded, installed, and configured (allthough Maven can help here) and license keys entered.

However, there is hope! (more…)

October 27, 2008

MicroXP just made Windows sexy for development

Filed under: Groovy,Java — stigl @ 1:58 pm
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There are times you have an application or job task which requires windows, and you need a Windows box with the least amount of hassle and small footprint.

Behold MicroXP; a stripped down version of WindowsXP. Match weight: 100MB distro, <500MB HDD, <50MB RAM, ~10min almost inputless installation and <20 second bootup time!!!

Just to test it out for development in parallels, downloaded Java 6 JDK, Maven and tested out the Smacking up Groovy demo in less than 10 seconds which creates a full Java/Groovy development environment with no hassle. And it worked!

Conclusion: Damn sweet footprint! You can propably get your chores done, and still be smiling. Bill Gates won’t love us, but since when has he appreciated Java anyways?

PS. I have been using OS X for over a year, and allthough MicroXP is sweet and sexy, I’m still content with having moved away.

October 24, 2008

Embedding a Groovy Console in Spring context

Filed under: Uncategorized — stigl @ 8:38 am
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In search of the perfect way of adding a console to my Java application, for debugging and test purposes, I stumbled upon the article Embedding a Groovy Console in a Java Server Application by Bruce Fancher. It has a code demo of which runs two flavors of Groovy Consoles from the Spring context of his application. This vantage point gives one access to all the services available to spring, and sits smack in the middle of the most important parts of your application where you can access services and databases. Check out the supplied demo, which still runs nicely with Ant + Tomcat.

October 11, 2008

Smacking up a Groovy demo in less than 10 seconds

Filed under: Groovy — stigl @ 1:39 pm
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Write mvn groovy:console , and you will get a console where you can execute Java/Groovy code by typing ctrl+enter/+enter.

If I were to learn a new language, or Java from scratch again in the University, This way of packaging would make a HUGE difference!

What next?

The sweet spot for using Groovy is

  • Familiarity to Java developers. Paste in your favorite Java code, and it will compile
  • Java classes are imported and used as normal
  • Strings, Files and many other standard classes have been extended with often-used functionality
  • Handling stuff on the file system – copying, deleting aso
  • Parsing XML in a nice DSL
  • Simple SQL/JDBC
  • Binding together a Java application

Resources

September 30, 2008

What I’m into right now

I thought I’d post updates on what I’m interested in, to give a glimpse of what I’m looking into and have moved away from. Perhaps I’ll have enough data to create a graph someday 🙂

Up and coming

  • Neo4J – A graph store – no more ORMappings
  • Qi4J – A composite development framework, a new way of writing Java applications, a way of life
  • Groovy GRAILS – Excellent for prototyping Java stuff
  • Mercurial – When thinking different, why not Version Control as well?
  • Swing Appframework, Java6u10 – Propably the next big thing in Rich Internet Applications
  • Visualization of graphs – Am looking for a nice, easy API for creating several hierarchical trees that I can drag and manipulate
  • Amazon EC2 – Java enabled servers on demand!
  • Twitter, Blog, IRC -New (and revisited) ways of communicating intra-project/company
  • javaBin, JavaZone – Working with the JavaZone conference for a year was damn fun!
    (more…)

June 27, 2008

Reading up on Groovy and Grails

Filed under: Groovy,Java — stigl @ 9:27 am
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The good thing about Groovy is its likeness to Java, and reading Groovy code should pose no difficulty to a seasoned Java programmer who’s taken a days worth reading. The problem with Groovy is writing good code. Not because you do it wrong, but you can always write it better! As with Ruby, there are alot of nifty features in the language that shortcuts ugly code in Java. But, you have to know that these features exists before you can use them. Grails? It just might become the next dogma in Java application development!

This is the litterature list and resources I’ve used in my pursuit of becoming a Groovier developer:
(more…)

June 13, 2008

Dissecting Grails for Maven building

Filed under: Groovy,Java — stigl @ 11:40 pm
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Show me your war, and I will tell you how it does!

Upgrading a Java project from a legacy buildsystem to Maven involves lots of reverse engineering to understand how the application works. Starting to investigate a project by its deliverables is often the most easy, taking a working application and picking away piece by piece, like dissecting a frog, to see if it still works after some abuse and halfchanced guesswork.

I started by grails create-app‘ing a simple book tutorial grails app, and grails war‘ing it. The contents of the war were extracted into src/main/webapp of a maven demo project, supported by groovy-all, GMaven (Groovy Maven plugin) and Maven Jetty plugin. (more…)

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